Department of History

Current Courses

2020-2021

NB:

  1. Cross-listed courses:  certain courses offered by the Departments of Modern Languages and Classics, Anthropology, and Religious Studies may, in special circumstances, be cross-listed and counted towards a major, minor, or concentration in History. In such cases, the student must obtain the Department's permission.  Those courses automatically acceptable in History are listed in the Academic Calendar and appear below.

  2. The following denotes full-year courses: "1XX/2YY," "AXX/AYY," "BXX/BYY." Students must enroll for both semesters when registering.  (The A and B designations denote different sections of the same course.)

  3. "WW" denotes web courses.

  4. Students are reminded that not every course listed in the Academic Calendar can be offered every year.  Some classes are only offered every couple years.  Students are encouraged to consult with the Department regarding course offerings in planning their schedules.

  5. Students are reminded that courses in History can be applicable for credit towards majors and minors in other disciplines and interdisciplinary programs and that not all courses automatically appear as such in the Academic Calendar.  Students are encouraged to consult with Departmental Chairs and Program Coordinators about specific courses in History that may be eligible for credit in programs outside History.

Class locations:

AG Art Gallery of Nova Scotia
AT Atrium
B Burke Building
DA Akerley Blvd., Dartmouth
DL Dartmouth Library
DT Spring Garden Road Library
HC Homburg Centre
LA Loyola Academic
ME McNally East
MM McNally Main
MN McNally North
MS McNally South
P21 Pier 21
SB Sobey Building
WT World Trade Convention Center

1000 Level Courses

HIST 1000 1 - Making History (Fall)
T. Stretton
MW 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: LA273
Course Description: Through examining a small number of historical events in depth, students will be introduced to the techniques required to practice history. They will have the opportunity to ‘make history’ by applying their skills in research, analytical thinking and writing to produce their own interpretations of select events. 
 
HIST 1000 2 - Making History (Winter)
R. Barbosa
MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: LA282
Course description: Through examining a small number of historical events in depth, students will be introduced to the techniques required to practice history. They will have the opportunity to ‘make history’ by applying their skills in research, analytical thinking and writing to produce their own interpretations of select events. 
 
HIST 1203 AXX/AYY - Twentieth Century in Europe (Fall/Winter)
6 credits (Full-year course)
TBA
TR 8:30 - 9:45 am
Class location: LA274
Course description: This course surveys the major issues and events of the Twentieth Century in Europe. Emphasis will be placed on the First and Second World Wars, the Nazi regime and the Holocaust, the emergence of the United States as a world power, Communist revolutions and their impact, and the effects of all of these events on the lives of ordinary people.
 
HIST 1203 BXX/BYY - Twentieth Century in Europe (Fall/Winter)
6 credits (Full-year course)
TBA
MW 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: SB265
Course description: This course surveys the major issues and events of the Twentieth Century in Europe. Emphasis will be placed on the First and Second World Wars, the Nazi regime and the Holocaust, the emergence of the United States as a world power, Communist revolutions and their impact, and the effects of all of these events on the lives of ordinary people.
 
HIST 1215 1WW - Ireland: An Introduction (Winter)
TBA
Online
Course description: The course is a general introduction to Ireland through a survey of the island’s history. Although it is situated on the fringes of Europe, Ireland was influenced by developments on the continent from the earliest times. In addition, the later experience of overseas migration connected Ireland to developments across the Atlantic and beyond. This course will pay particular attention to how Ireland’s history reflects these broader European and transatlantic connections.
 
HIST 1222 1 - Intro to East Asian History (Fall)
TBA

MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: LA181

Course description: This introductory course explores historical change and social transformation in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam from antiquity to the present. Emphasizing especially the Chinese and Japanese experiences, this class will examine some of the most salient social, intellectual, political, and economic features apparent in the heritage of these societies, as well as some of the ways each society has influenced the others.
 
HIST 1222 2 - Intro to East Asian History (Winter)
TBA
TR 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: B221
Course description: This introductory course explores historical change and social transformation in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam from antiquity to the present. Emphasizing especially the Chinese and Japanese experiences, this class will examine some of the most salient social, intellectual, political, and economic features apparent in the heritage of these societies, as well as some of the ways each society has influenced the others.
 
HIST 1252 1– Canada to Confederation (Fall)
TBA
MW 8:30 - 9:45 am
Class location: SB265
Course description: This course will examine early Canadian history from the time of the first native-European contact up to Confederation.  Emphasis will be placed on the development of New France/Lower Canada, Upper Canada, and the West.  Political, social, and economic themes will be considered.
 
HIST 1253 2A - Canada: Confederation to Present (Winter)
TBA
MW 8:30 - 9:45 am
Class location: SB265
Course description: This course will examine the shape of political culture in modern Canada; the debate between the advocates of the nation state and of federalism; and the impact of industrialization, regionalism, war, and depression on that debate.
 
HIST 1253 2B – Canada: Conferation to Present (Winter)
H. Green
TR 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location:LA273
Course description: This course will examine the shape of political culture in modern Canada; the debate between the advocates of the nation state and of federalism; and the impact of industrialization, regionalism, war, and depression on that debate.
 
HIST 1255 1 - The United States: 1865 to Present (Fall)
TBA
TR 4 - 5:15 pm
Class location: LA297
Course Description: This course will explore the history of the modern United States since its Civil War, examining the social, economic, political, and transnational developments of the last century and a half. Through lectures and reading, we will cover such themes as political economy, international relations, urbanization, social movements, migration, and the development of the state.
 
HIST 1255 2 - The United States: 1865 to Present  (Winter)
TBA
TR 4:00 - 5:15 pm
Class location: LA297
Course description: This course will explore the history of the modern United States since its Civil War, examining the social, economic, political, and transnational developments of the last century and a half. Through lectures and reading, we will cover such themes as political economy, international relations, urbanization, social movements, migration, and the development of the state.
 
HIST 1301 1A - Into: History of Science & Technologies (Fall)
L. Digdon
Online
Course descriptionThe modern concept of science encompasses the study of the natural world in a systematic manner to accumulate knowledge. The term “science” dates only to the early nineteenth century, however, humans’ desire to understand the world around them stretches back through human history. Throughout the term we will follow the evolution of scientific inquiry and methodology from antiquity to modernity. This course examines the major developments in the history of science and technology, including the emergence of science in antiquity, medieval science, the Scientific Revolution, the expansion of science in the modern world, the relation between science and society, and the cultural significance of science and technology. 
 
HIST 1301 1B - Into: History of Science & Technologies (Fall)
L. Digdon
Online
Course descriptionThe modern concept of science encompasses the study of the natural world in a systematic manner to accumulate knowledge. The term “science” dates only to the early nineteenth century, however, humans’ desire to understand the world around them stretches back through human history. Throughout the term we will follow the evolution of scientific inquiry and methodology from antiquity to modernity. This course examines the major developments in the history of science and technology, including the emergence of science in antiquity, medieval science, the Scientific Revolution, the expansion of science in the modern world, the relation between science and society, and the cultural significance of science and technology. 
 
HIST 1301 2A - Into: History of Science & Technologies (Winter)
L. Digdon
MW 8:30 - 9:45 am 
Class location: LA296
Course descriptionThe modern concept of science encompasses the study of the natural world in a systematic manner to accumulate knowledge. The term “science” dates only to the early nineteenth century, however, humans’ desire to understand the world around them stretches back through human history. Throughout the term we will follow the evolution of scientific inquiry and methodology from antiquity to modernity. This course examines the major developments in the history of science and technology, including the emergence of science in antiquity, medieval science, the Scientific Revolution, the expansion of science in the modern world, the relation between science and society, and the cultural significance of science and technology. 
 
HIST 1301 2B - Into: History of Science & Technologies (Winter)
L. Digdon

MW 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: LA188

Course description: The modern concept of science encompasses the study of the natural world in a systematic manner to accumulate knowledge. The term “science” dates only to the early nineteenth century, however, humans’ desire to understand the world around them stretches back through human history. Throughout the term we will follow the evolution of scientific inquiry and methodology from antiquity to modernity. This course examines the major developments in the history of science and technology, including the emergence of science in antiquity, medieval science, the Scientific Revolution, the expansion of science in the modern world, the relation between science and society, and the cultural significance of science and technology. 

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2000 Level Courses 

HIST 2200 1 History of Media & Communications in Europe (Fall)
L Warner
Online
Course description: In this course on the long history of communications and the media, students will cover topics such as the making of medieval manuscripts, the printing revolution, censorship, the rise of the newspaper, the creation of public libraries, the inventions of photography, the telegraph, telephone and television, and the shift to digital formats, the world wide web, internet and social media.
 
HIST 2201 1WW - Environmental History of Europe: 1300-1900 (Fall)
L. Warner
Online
Course description: From farming practices in the medieval period to the smog and blackened landscapes of the industrial nineteenth century, Europeans have had an impact on their environment. Students explore the changes and how European encounters with the new world brought disease, and an exchange of foods, animals and plants between 204 History the continents. This course provides a long-term perspective on changes in climate, water and land use, breeding as well as species extinction, and the foods available in Europe and its North American colonies from 1300-1900.
 
HIST 2250 1 Soccer: A History of Brazil (Fall)
R. Barbosa
T 4:00 - 6:29 pm
Class location: LA271
Course description: Students will trace the historical forces behind the evolution of soccer in Brazil – from an elite sport to a national passion with unifying powers. Topics include: the transition to a slave free society, immigration, the development of a national identity, urbanization, the military dictatorship, as well as gender divisions and the role of the media and economics behind the popularity of the sport.
 
HIST 2310 2WW Rethinking Rural Nova Scotia (Winter)
K Kehoe
Online
Course description: Students assess the significance of Nova Scotia’s rural landscapes by developing an understanding of their complex representations and histories. By using materials and approaches from both history and literature, students explore the value of interdisciplinary research for generating new thinking about how the past can inform the future.
 
HIST 2317 1 - Africa in the 20th Century
TBA
MW 4:00 - 5:15 pm
Class location: LA177
Course description: An examination of the activities of the colonial powers in governing the territories and peoples which they acquired in the ‘Scramble’. The course will also study the reactions of Africans to colonialism and the factors which led to independence.
 
HIST 2318 1XX/2YY The US and the World since 1865 (Fall/Winter)
6 credits (Full-year course)
TBA
TR 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: MM335
Course description:  This course traces the interaction between the United States and the rest of the world in order to understand how the US has risen to a position of unparalleled might. It focuses on structures of dominance based on gender, race, and class in order to ascertain how the world has been influenced by the US and how its projection of power has shaped the United States domestically. It pays attention to the policies of Presidents and Secretaries of State, themes of oppression, liberation, migration, consumption, globalization, and forms of popular culture (especially film) which represent and construct the transnational trajectories of US power.
 
HIST 2342 1 Atlantic Canada since 1867 (Fall)
TBA
MW  11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Course location: LA282
Course description: Beginning with the post-Confederation era, and then moving into the phases of industrialization and deindustrialization, students will study social, economic, and political developments in the region up to the end of the twentieth century and beyond. Major events such as the two World Wars will also be considered
 
HIST 2381 1 China before 1800
X Sun
MW 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: B207
Course description: This course explores roughly four millennia of Chinese history, from the distant origins of Chinese society to its zenith during the Qing Dynasty. Divided into three eras - Ancient, Early Imperial, and Late Imperial - the class follows a thematic approach that considers the dynamics of political, economic, intellectual, and social change within each era. No previous study of China is required.
 
HIST 2382 2 China in Revolution: 1800-1949 (Winter)
X Sun
TR 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: MM223
Course description: This course explores the collapse of imperial China and the ensuing efforts to renew Chinese society. While chronological, the course follows a thematic approach, considering the dynamics of political, economic, intellectual, and social change within the Late Imperial and Republican eras. No previous study of China is required, but History 1222 or 2381 are recommended.
 
HIST 2394 1 History of Korea (Winter)
TBA
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MM224
Course description: After a brief survey of the rise of Korean civilization since antiquity, this course examines three turbulent eras in Korean history: (1) the long era of gradual change during the Yi dynasty that culminated in confrontation with imperialist powers, (2) the half-century of Japanese domination, and (3) the era of civil war and continuing division. Although the course proceeds chronologically, in order to provide students with a more analytical understanding the course employs a thematic approach, considering political, economic, intellectual, and social issues in each era. 
 
HIST 2401 2 - Canadian Political History (Winter)
TBA
MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: LA273
Course description: The course is an overview of Canadian political history from Confederation to the early 2000s, introducing students to the study of political power in its historical, social, and cultural context. Focusing mainly on federal politics, the course will examine expressions of authority and resistance in Canadian history, stressing the complicated interactions between governed and governors. The study of politicians and key events in Canada’s political history will be grounded in themes of inclusion and exclusion, and coercion and consent. Students are encouraged to think culturally, investigating how politics draw from and contribute to ideas about race, class, and gender. While the history of Canadian politics will be the course’s focus, lectures, assignments, and discussions will also stress the politics of history-making in Canada, focusing on how certain narratives have been politicized.
 
HIST 2402 2 - History of Cuba (Winter)
TBA
MW 4:00 - 5:15 pm
Class location: ME108
Course description: Students will gain a multifaceted and nuanced view of Cuba's complex past, examining how this history has shaped and continues to shape the present. Themes include gender and race relations, social policies and programs, governance and politics, state-building and economic development.
 
HIST 2420 1 - The World at War 1914-1918 (Fall)
TBA
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: LA271
Course description: Students are introduced to the Second World War and its importance in global history. Themes include: the war’s roots in the 1910s, the goals of Axis and Allied powers, and military operations on land, at sea, and in the air. Special attention will be paid to the war’s impact on civilians.
 
HIST 2452 1 Greek History II: Golden Age
A. Barclay
TR 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: LA296
Course description: An introduction to the history of the Greeks from the Persian Wars through the death of Alexander the Great. Students will study historical, political and cultural developments of the Greeks in the 5th and 4th centuries BC, including the rise and fall of Athens, democracy in action and the cultural achievements of Athens in her “Golden Age.” Students will also explore the activities of other Greek states, the roles of men and women in Greek society, the causes and aftermath of the Peloponnesian wars, the conquest of Greece by Philip II of Macedon, and of the Persian Empire by his son, Alexander.
 
HIST 2454 2 - Bloody Caesars: Roman History II (Winter)
TBA
TR 11:30 - 12:45 pm
Class location: LA274
Course description: An introduction to the history of the Roman world from the establishment of the Principate under Octavian/Augustus to the decline of the Roman empire in the western Mediterranean and Europe. This course will explore the evolution of the Principate and it eventual replacement by the Dominate, the nature of Roman imperialism, the role of the emperor as a political and religious figure, the interaction among the Romans and their neighbours in central Europe and the Near East, and the eventual political and economic disintegration of the imperial system. Students will be asked to consider such topics as different models of Roman economic, social, and political organization, the role and status of women in the Roman world, the codification of the Roman legal system, and the intellectual and religious developments that laid the foundations for subsequent historical periods in Western Europe and the Mediterranean. 
 
HIST 2472 2 History of Hockey (Winter)
TBA
MW 8:30 - 9:45 am
Class location: LA274
Course description: Students analytically examine the evolution of sports such as shinty, hurling, field hockey, ice hockey, and sledge hockey from the nineteenth century onwards, commencing with the earliest forms of vernacular stick sports. Although the scope will be international, special attention will be paid to Atlantic Canada.
 
HIST 2833 1 - Special Topic: Environmental History of North America (Fall)
H. Green
TR 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: HC211
Course description: This special topics course will introduce students to the skills and practice of doing environmental history – a historical approach that examines the relationship between humans and the rest of the natural world and emphasizes the importance of the physical environment to our past. The goal of this course is to understand the historical interactions and relationships between human groups and the rest of the natural environment.

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3000 Level Courses 

HIST 3000 1 - The Discipline of History (Fall)
T. Stretton
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm 
Class location: ME104
Course description: This course addresses the theories, methods, principles and problems associated with the discipline of history. It examines the following basic areas of historical inquiry: the purposes of historical study; the relevance of the past; the relationship between the past and present; the nature and validity of historical knowledge; the relationship of history to other disciplines; and the development of historical interpretation. 
 
HIST 3000 2 - The Discipline of History (Winter)
T. Stretton
MW 1:00 - 2:15 pm
Class location: ME104
Course description: This course addresses the theories, methods, principles and problems associated with the discipline of history. It examines the following basic areas of historical inquiry: the purposes of historical study; the relevance of the past; the relationship between the past and present; the nature and validity of historical knowledge; the relationship of history to other disciplines; and the development of historical interpretation. 
 
HIST 3202 2 History of Medicine (Winter)
P. Twohig
MW 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: B207
Course description: Students examine the history of medicine, with an emphasis on Europe and North America, and how medicine in those areas interacted with other medical systems, including Arabic and Chinese medicine. Topics to be considered include the impact of epidemic disease, ideas of disease causation and treatment, the rise of the hospital, medicine and war, and the creation of an idea of international and global health.
 
HIST 3203 1WW History of the Body, Health & Sex (Fall)
L. Warner
Online
Course description: Students surveys the changing knowledge of human anatomy, attitudes to health care, hygiene, and clothing, understandings of conception, pregnancy and childbirth as well as the histories of sexuality and same-sex relationships in the centuries from the Renaissance to the early industrial era.
 
HIST 3300 1WW - British Pop Music & Culture (Fall)
TBA
Online
Course description: This course will explore popular culture in the United Kingdom during the 19th and 20th centuries through the study of popular music. Attention will be given to the youth culture that emerged after the Second World War and its importance for the spread of Rock and Pop music. In addition to developments in the United Kingdom, American and Imperial cultural influences will also be examined through musical styles and movements such as Rock and Roll, Punk, and Reggae.
 
HIST 3300 2WW - British Pop Music & Culture (Winter)
TBA
Online
Course description: This course will explore popular culture in the United Kingdom during the 19th and 20th centuries through the study of popular music. Attention will be given to the youth culture that emerged after the Second World War and its importance for the spread of Rock and Pop music. In addition to developments in the United Kingdom, American and Imperial cultural influences will also be examined through musical styles and movements such as Rock and Roll, Punk, and Reggae.
 
HIST 3301 2 Crime & Punishment in England before 1800 (Winter)
T. Stretton
MW 10:00 - 11:15 am
Class location: LA273
Course description: This course is a survey of the history of crime and punishment in England in an age before professional police forces and standing armies. Students trace the evolution of criminal courts, the role of juries and the shift from physical punishments to imprisonment and transportation. Other topics include medieval ordeals, dueling, riots and popular protest. 
 
HIST 3403 1 - Invention of Canada (Fall)
TBA
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: LA275
Course description: Nations can be defined in many ways. Most obviously, they are political jurisdictions characterized by clear geographic boundaries, with constitutionally established legislative, juridical and coercive institutions, and in the case of democratic nations such as Canada, regular elections, a free press, and guaranteed freedoms of speech and association. But nations are also imaginary constructs. Over the years different generations of Canadians have imagined their history, and the presumed values or social purposes that the nation embodies, in different ways. This course will look at the ways in which various generations of Canadians “invented” Canada and its history. This course will be an exercise in deconstructing shifting national mythologies and the interests that they served in order to present a more inclusive and comprehensive understanding of Canada’s past.
 
HIST 3417 2 - War & Memory in the 20th Century (Winter)
TBA
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: AT216
Course description: This course will explore the experience of modern war and the ways in which various twentieth-century conflicts have been remembered socially and culturally. The topics covered include the First and Second World Wars, the Holocaust, the Algerian War, the Vietnam War, and the Balkan Wars. The focus of our study of these events will be on their impact on the values, attitudes and collective memory of European and North American societies.
 
HIST 3451 2 Film and History: The North (Winter) 
H. Green
W 4:00 - 6:29 pm
Class location: LA276
Class description: Based around documentary and feature films, this seminar course critically explores the history of The North from the 18th century to the present. Although this is a 6 credit hour course, it is normally offered over one term. Students should expect a larger workload when compared to a three credit course.
 
HIST 3505 2 Museum Studies (Winter)
TBA
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: ME104
Course description: Students are introduced to the world of museums and museum studies. They will learn about the history of museums, the constantly evolving purpose of such institutions, particularly during the twentieth century and in the contemporary world, their role in public education, archival and collections management, exhibitions, funding models, governance, and current debates in the field. This course is a combination of seminars and site visits to museums, which will require that students engage with the museum community in Nova Scotia.
 
HIST 3836 2 Special Topic: War Crimes Trials
TBA
TR 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: LA179
Course description: This course follows the evolution of the laws of war and war crimes trials as they have been altered and applied against the changing nature of warfare from the penning of the Lieber Code in 1863 through to the adoption of the Rome Statute in 1998 which provided the legal basis for the International Criminal Court. It explores historical negotiations, legal precedents, and investigates how and when the laws of war have been tested, ignored, and enforced for prevention and punishment in global and civil wars, wars of independence, as well as ethnic conflicts throughout the twentieth century. Through lectures, readings, research, and discussion groups, students will be exposed to the legal, diplomatic, strategic, and human rights mechanisms of restricting warfare, and identify the considerable problems that have emerged from efforts to prevent war crimes or seek justice in the aftermath of their repeated commission.

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4000 Level Courses

HIST 4200 1 Women's Rights in Briain 1500-1925 (Fall)
T. Stretton
T 1:00 - 3:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: The rights and obligations of women in a society are often central to their status, economic power and life experience. Students examine changes in women’s legal rights, entitlements and duties in England and (to a lesser extent) Wales and Scotland over the course of more than four centuries. Topics include property rights, inheritance practices, domestic violence, the gap between legal theory and social practice, the differing experiences of single, married and widowed women, female citizenship and nationality, and women suffrage.
 
HIST 4301 2 Community Leadership in Atlantic Canada (Winter)
K. Kehoe
W 4:00 - 6:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: Students use historical perspectives to understand current affairs in meaningful and evidence-based ways. Students are challenged to think about the broad application of research, communication, and critical-thinking skills to real-world situations through guest lectures, innovative learning materials and project creation.
 
HIST 4500 1XX/2YY - The Honours Seminar (Fall/Winter)
6 credits (Full-year course)
K. Freeman
W 1:00 - 3:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: Honours History students have the opportunity to engage in independent research and write an honours thesis with the help and direction of a supervisor.  The Honours Seminar provides a framework to assist each student in the preparation of the thesis.  The seminar places an emphasis on research skills, historical methods and approaches, theories of history and the use of sources and evidence in order to help students develop and write the honours thesis.  Students will be evaluated on their course work and presentations as well as the honours thesis.
 
HIST 4530 2 - Slaves & Migrants in Latin America (Winter)
R. Barbosa
M 4:00 - 6:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: This course will examine the reasons and consequences of migration in Latin America. It will emphasize the forced migration of Africans and the free migration of Europeans and Japanese to countries such as Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba and Peru.
 
HIST 4574 2 - Interdisciplinary Study of Asia: Food (Winter)
X. Sun
R 4:00 - 6:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: In this seminar students examine memories of the Asia-Pacific War in China, Korea and Japan. They will investigate how history and politics have been shaping and shaped by collective and individual memories of this conflict.
 
HIST 4843 1 Special Topic: Environmental History of China (Fall)
X. Sun
R 2:30 - 3:59 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: This seminar course examines China’s environmental challenges and their deep roots in history. It explores key topics including philosophies of nature, land and wetland management, water control, the ecology of war, sustainability, environmental governance and public engagement.

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6000 Level Courses

HIST 6200 1 Women`s Rights in Britain 1500-1925 (Fall)
T. Stretton
T 1:00 - 3:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: The rights and obligations of women in a society are often central to their status, economic power and life experience. Students examine changes in women’s legal rights, entitlements and duties in England and (to a lesser extent) Wales and Scotland over the course of more than four centuries. Topics include property rights, inheritance practices, domestic violence, the gap between legal theory and social practice, the differing experiences of single, married and widowed women, female citizenship and nationality, and women suffrage.
 
HIST 6301 2 Community Leadership in Atlantic Canada (Winter)
K. Kehoe
W 4:00 - 6:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: Students use historical perspectives to understand current affairs in meaningful and evidence-based ways. Students are challenged to think about the broad application of research, communication, and critical-thinking skills to real-world situations through guest lectures, innovative learning materials and project creation.
 
HIST 6530 2 Slaves & Migrants in Latin America (Winter)
R. Barbosa
M 4:00 - 6:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: This course will examine the reasons and consequences of migration in Latin America. It will emphasize the forced migration of Africans and the free migration of Europeans and Japanese to countries 
 
HIST 6574 2 - Interdisciplinary Study Asia (Winter)
X. Sun
R 4:00 - 6:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: In this seminar students examine memories of the Asia-Pacific War in China, Korea and Japan. They will investigate how history and politics have been shaping and shaped by collective and individual memories of this conflict.
 
HIST 6650 1XX/2YY - Seminar in Advanced Historiography (Fall/Winter)  - Required
6 credits (Full-year course)
K. Freeman
W 1:00 - 3:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course Description: This seminar will examine selected contemporary historiographical issues and guide Masters students in the preparation of their thesis proposals.
 
HIST 6674 1 Special Topic: Environmental History of China (Fall)
X. Sun
T 2:30 - 3:59 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: This seminar course examines China’s environmental challenges and their deep roots in history. It explores key topics including philosophies of nature, land and wetland management, water control, the ecology of war, sustainability, environmental governance and public engagement.
 
HIST 6690 1XX/2YY – Thesis Research (Fall/Winter) - Required
K. Freeman
TBA
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Students will engage in the research and writing of a thesis under the supervision of a thesis supervisor.  The student must satisfy the supervisor that thesis research and all other methodological and disciplinary preparation for the successful handling of the thesis topic have been completed.  Supervisors may require a demonstration of language competence or extra course work as preparation for the treatment of certain thesis topics.  Students will publicly defend their thesis, following which a final grade will be determined by the thesis committee.
 

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