Department of Modern Languages & Classics

Calendar Courses

Classics - Ancient History (CLAS)

1001.1(2) Ancient Civilizations of the Near East and Egypt
Prerequisite: none
An introduction to the civilization and cultural contributions of the ancient Near East and Egypt. Aided by illustrated lectures and the study of ancient literature, students will explore the history, political organizations, art and monuments of these early civilizations. The course is not open to students with credit in CLAS 2200.0

1002.192) The Ancient Civilization of Greece and Rome
Prerequisite: none
A general introduction to the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome with particular regard to history, political organization, material culture, and contributions to western cultural development. Students will examine primary sources relevant to the history, social, and political organization of Greek and Roman society, and be introduced to the art, architecture, and material culture of these two ancient cultures.

2000.1(2) An introduction to Greek Art and Archaeology
Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in Classics, Anthropology 1271, or a 2000-level course in HIST.
This course is a survey of the art and archaeology of the ancient Greek world from the Late Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period. Aided by slides and other visual media student will become acquainted with the "major arts" (painting, sculpture, architecture) and other material remains of the ancient Greeks. Through the application of art historical and archaeological method and theory, students will also explore the origins and development of pivotal examples of ancient Greek art, artifacts and movements within their broader social, historical and religious contexts (e.g. Corinthian and Athenian vase-painting, the Parthenon, Praxitiles' Aphrodite of Knidos). This course is not open to students who have received credit in CLAS 3311, "Art in Greece and/or the Ancient Near East".

2100.1(2) A Survey of Roman Art and Archaeology
Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in Classics, Anthropology 1271, or a 2000-level course in History.
This course investigates important issues and current problems in the art and archaeology of the ancient Roman world. Students will focus on a careful examination of the material record of the ancient Romans, including architecture, works of art, and artifacts, and though the lens of art historical and archaeological method and theory, be asked to understand complex cultural phenomena such as imperialism, urbanism, gender definitions, ethnicity, economic behaviour, cultural interaction, and culture change. Aided by slides and other visual media, students will be presented with the images of the great works of art and architecture of the Roman world, such as the Pantheon and the Augustus Prima Port, and will examine the great sites of the Roman world, a list that may include Pompeii, Ostia, Rome, Ephesus, and Constantinople. Students who have taken CLAS 3312. "Art of the Hellenistic World and/or Rome," are not eligible to receive credit for this course.

*2201.1(.2) The Mythology of Greece and Rome I
Students will explore the nature of mythology in Ancient Greece and Rome through a survey of the principal myths of the gods and goddesses. Emphasis will be placed on myths describing the creation of the universe, the gods and their powers, the origin of humans and the relationships between gods and mortals. Students will read a selection of works of Classical literature and will come to understand how these myths helped shape the life and thought of the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome.

*2202.1(.2) The Mythology of Greece and Rome II
The course deals with the nature of mythology and the subject matter of some of the principal myths of Greece and Rome. Emphasis is on the concept of the hero in Greek and Roman literature and culture. As such, students will read works of Classical literature that touch on this and related themes.

2451,1(2) Greek History I : From Minos to the Medes/ HIST 2451.1(2)
Prerequisite: 3.0 credit hours in Classics or History
An introduction to the history and culture of the ancient Greeks from the Bronze Age through the Persion Wards. Student will explore Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations and the social, historical and cultural development of the Archaic period including the origins of the Greek and the evolution of the polis and early political systems. Among the topics students will examine the evaluation of the Spartan military state, Athenian democracy, pre-Classical Greek religion, art, architecture and literature. Students will be asked to read the works of various ancient authors and to consider the archaeological and epigraphical evidence for this period of Greek history.

Note: This course is not open to students who have received credit in CLAS 3303/HIST 2350

2452.1(2) Greek History II: The Golden Age of Greece
HIST 2452.1(2)
Prerequisite: 3.0 credit hours in Classics or History.
An introduction to the history of the Greeks from the Persian Wars through the death of Alexander the Great. Students will study the historical, political and cultural developments on the Greeks in the 5th and 4th centuries BC, including the rise and fall of Athens, democracy in action and the cultural achievements of Athens in her "Golden Age" (e.g. religion, theatre, philosophy, art and architecture). Students will also explore the activities of other Greek states (e.g. Sparta, Boeotia, Syracuse), the roles of men and women in Greek society, the causes and aftermath of the Peloponnesian wars, the conquest of Greece by Phillip II of Macedon and of the Persian Empire by his son, Alexander. Students will be asked to read various works of ancient authors and to consider archaeological and epigraphical evidence relevant to this period of Greek history.

2453.1(2) Republic and Revolution: Roman History I
HIST 2453.1(2)

Prerequisites: 3.0 credit hours in Classics or History or permission of the instructor.
An introduction to the history of Italy and the city of Rome from the Iron Age through the end of the Roman republican system of government. This course will explore the origins and evolution of the Roman Republic, including the interaction between Romans, their Italian neighbours such as the Etruscans, and the Greek and Phoenician peoples of the eastern Mediterranean. Among the topics students will examine are the political and military history of the period as well as the social and cultural context that encapsulate and inform this history, and the period as well as the social and cultural context that encapsulate and inform this history, and the eventual decline of the republican system amidst the political turmoil and revolution of the first century BC/BCE. Students will be asked to read the works of various ancient authors and to consider archaeological and epigraphic evidence for this history of the roman republic. Content will vary from year to year.

2454.1(2) Bloody Ceasars: Roman History II
HIST 2454.1(2)

An introduction to the history of the Roman world from the establishment of the Principate under Octavian/Augustus to the decline of the Roman empire in the western Mediterranean and Europe. This course will explore the evolution of the Principate and its eventual replacement by the Dominate, the nature of Roman imperialism, the role of the emperor as a political and religious figure, the interaction between the Romans and their neighbours in central Europe and the Near East, and the eventual political and economic disintegration of the imperial system. Students will be asked to consider such topics as different models of Roman economic, social, and political organization, the role and status of women in the Roman world, the codification of the Roman legal system, and the intellectual and religious developments that laid the foundations for subsequent historical periods in western Europe and the Mediterranean. Students will be asked to read the works of various ancient authors and to consider archaeological and epigraphic evidence relevant to the history of the Roman imperial period. Content may vary from year to year.

Back to Top

3000.1(2) Topics in Greek Art and Archaeology
Prerequisite: 6.0 credit hours in Classics or 3.0 credit hours in Classics and ANTH 1271.1(2) or one of HIST 2451.1(2); HIST 2452.1(2); HIST 2453.1(2); HIST 2454.1(2) or by permission of instructor.
This course addresses a specific topic, theme, period, or geographical region related to the study of Greek Archaeology. Specific topic and course content will be different each time the course is offered, so the students should check with the program coordinator for Classics about the specific topic on offer for the current semester. Topics may include art and architecture of the Aegean Bronze Are (Minoans and Mycenaean), urban life in the Greeks city-state, art and politics in Archaic and Classical Greece, cultural interaction between Greece, the near East and Egypt or Greek iconography. This course is intended to follow CLAS 2000.1(2), "Introduction to Greek Art and Archaeology", but students with a background in archaeology, History, Classics, or Art History are also encouraged to enroll.

3100.1(2) Topics in Roman Archaeology
Prerequisite: 6.0 credit hours in Classics or 3.0 credit hours in Classics and ANTH 1271.1(2) or one of : HIST 2451.1(2); HIST 2452.1(2); HIST 2453.1(2); HIST 2454.1(2) or by permission of instructor.
This course addresses a specific topic, theme, period,or geographical region related to the study of Roman Archaeology. Specific topic and course content will be different each time the course is offered, so students should check with the Program coordinator for Classics about the specific topic on offer for the current semester. Topics may include art and architecture of the Augustan Gage, Etruscan art and archaeology, the art and archaeology of the Roman provinces, or the art and architecture of empire. This course is intended to follow CLAS 2100,"Introduction to Roman Art and Archaeology," but student with a background in archaeology, history, Classics, or art history are also encouraged to enroll.

3310.1 Classical Literature (ENGL 3310)
3 credit hours

This course is a survey of the literature of ancient Greece and/or Rome in English translation. Course content will be organized either thematically, for example on women in Classical literature or metamorphosis, or by genre, for example on epic, tragedy, or comedy. The course is intended for students who have some background in Classics and/or Classical literature.

3317.1(2) Greek Sanctuaries / RELS 3314.1(2)
Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in Classics, and 3 credit hours in one of the following: Classics, History, Anthropology or Religious Studies.
This course explores ancient Greek religion and the role of the sanctuary in Greek culture. Students will study the archaeological remains and documentary evidence for the role and function of domestic, civic, and panhellenic sanctuaries (e.g., household cults, the Athenian Acropolis, Olympia, Delphi). Students will also consider sites which provide examples of specialty cults (healing, oracular, mystery religions) or which illustrate particular social, political or archaeological issues.

3318.1(2) Classical Archaeology
Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in Classics, and 3 credit hours in one of the following: Classics, History, Anthropology or Religious Studies. For students majoring in Anthropology, the prerequisite is ANTH 1271.1(2)
A study of the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome based on the material remains (e.g., artifacts, architecture, epigraphy). Students will learn how archaeology has helped shape our understanding of these ancient cultures through an exploration of the pioneer days of Classical archaeology, modern methods of interpretation, and of the sites, artifacts and monuments in their cultural contexts.

3352.1(2) Women in Antiquity I / RELS 3306.1(2); WMST 3352.1(2)
Medea's passion, Aspasia's intellect, and the famous Cleopatra's tragic brilliance are all present in the women of antiquity. This course will examine the ways in which women of different social classes lived in the ancient Near East, including Ancient Israel, and Greece. The development of women's roles and relationships between men and women will be considered in the context of history, religion, myth, and literature.

3353.1(2) Women in Antiquity II / RELS 3307.1(2); WMST 3353.1(2)
Roman women were doctors, artists, large landowners, beloved wives and mothers. Some, like Dido and Lesbia, were subject matter for famous poets. In this course we will also examine how the development of Christianity in the Roman Empire both softened some abuses against women and aggravated others. From archaeology, literature, and religion, this course examines women's lives from Hellenistic times until the end of the Roman Empire.

3600.1(2) Fieldwork in Archaeology
Cross listed: ANTH 3373.1(2)
Prerequisite: ANTH 1271(.2) or at least three (3) credit hours in Classics
This course offers detailed instruction with practical application of archaeological field techniques. This course is generally taught off-capus at an archaeological site. As such, the course is dependent upon external funds and has a limited enrollment. Please consult the Department Chairperson regarding availability.

3610.1(2) Field Study in Roman Archaeology
Prerequisite: 3.0 credit hours in Classics or ANTH 1271.1(2)
The practical application of archaeological field techniques and method as it pertains to the study of Classical Roman sites in the Mediterranean and Europe. This course is always taught off-campus at one or more ancient Roman sites in Europe, most frequently Italy. Consequently, the course is dependent upon external funds and has a limited enrollment. Please consult the Program Coordinator of classics regarding availability.

3826.1(2) - 3849.1(2) Thematic Selected Topics in Classics
Prerequisite: 6.0 credit hours in Classics or permissions of the instructor.
A series of courses on selected topics that will be determined by the course instructor. Each course will focus on particular themes in Classical culture (history, archaeology, art and/or literature) and/or specific chronological periods. The subject matter of these courses will be announced occasionally.

4405.0 Advanced Reading and Tutorial
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.
A course based on directed readings and research. The contents of the course will be determined by the specific interests of the professor and the students involved. Students will have the opportunity to pursue in depth their individual interests in the field of Classics, and will meet regularly with a member of the Department to discuss their research. To register in this course students must demonstrate a satisfactory background in Classics or the Ancient World of the Near East and an ability to do independent research.

4876.1(2) - 4899.1(2) Directed Study
Prerequisite: At least twelve (12) credit hours in Classics or permission of instructor.
A three (3) credit hour course open to students who wish to pursue a special topic or topics in Classics through tutorials, independent study, and research. The availability of this course depends upon the agreement of a particular faculty member who is prepared to direct the tutorial and study program.

Classics - Greek (GREK)

1100.0 Introductory Ancient Greek
An introductory course covering the major grammatical points of the ancient Greek language. This course will be followed in succeeding years by more advanced courses in the reading and interpretation of classical authors.

2200.0 Second Year Ancient Greek
Prerequisite: GREK 1100.0.
An application of the major grammatical points of the ancient Greek language through the reading of selected works of classical authors:

  • Homer, Iliad
  • Xenophon, Anabasis
  • the dramatists
  • lyric poetry

Classics - Latin (LATIN)

1100.0 Introduction to Latin
A course in the essentials of Latin grammar for students beginning their study of this ancient language. Since Latin is an inflected language with many changes in endings, students should be prepared to work hard at understanding and learning its basic structures.

2201.0 Intermediate Latin
Prerequisite: LAT 1100.0 or equivalent.
This course aims to enhance the development of good techniques of Latin-English translation and of rendering English into idiomatic Classical Latin. A variety of Latin authors and the continued study of Latin grammar will be utilized to achieve those objectives.

Back to Top