Department of History

Current Coursesjavascript:;

2017-18

NB:

  1. Cross-listed courses:  certain courses offered by the Departments of Modern Languages and Classics, Anthropology, and Religious Studies may, in special circumstances, be cross-listed and counted towards a major, minor, or concentration in History. In such cases, the student must obtain the Department's permission.  Those courses automatically acceptable in History are listed in the Academic Calendar and appear below.

  2. The following denotes full-year courses: "1XX/2YY," "AXX/AYY," "BXX/BYY." Students must enroll for both semesters when registering.  (The A and B designations denote different sections of the same course.)

  3. "WW" denotes web courses.

  4. Students are reminded that not every course listed in the Academic Calendar can be offered every year.  Some classes are only offered every couple years.  Students are encouraged to consult with the Department regarding course offerings in planning their schedules.

  5. Students are reminded that courses in History can be applicable for credit towards majors and minors in other disciplines and interdisciplinary programs and that not all courses automatically appear as such in the Academic Calendar.  Students are encouraged to consult with Departmental Chairs and Program Coordinators about specific courses in History that may be eligible for credit in programs outside History.

Class locations:

AG Art Gallery of Nova Scotia
AT Atrium
B Burke Building
DA Akerley Blvd., Dartmouth
DL Dartmouth Library
DT Spring Garden Road Library
HC Homburg Centre
LA Loyola Academic
ME McNally East
MM McNally Main
MN McNally North
MS McNally South
P21 Pier 21
SB Sobey Building
WT World Trade Convention Center

1000 Level Courses

HIST 1000 1A/2 - Making History (Fall/Winter)
T. Stretton
MW 10 - 11:15 am
Class location: B207
Course Description: Through examining a small number of historical events in depth, students will be introduced to the techniques required to practice history. They will have the opportunity to ‘make history’ by applying their skills in research, analytical thinking and writing to produce their own interpretations of select events. 
 
HIST 1000 1B/2B - Making History (Fall/Winter)
M. Vance
TR 8:30 - 9-45 am
Class location: LA274
Course description: Through examining a small number of historical events in depth, students will be introduced to the techniques required to practice history. They will have the opportunity to ‘make history’ by applying their skills in research, analytical thinking and writing to produce their own interpretations of select events. 
 
HIST 1201 1XX/2YY – Civilization in the West (Fall/Winter)
L. Warner
TR 1 - 2:15 pm
Class location: B221
Course description: Modern Western cultures, from Canada and the United States to Britain and Australia, have complex multi-ethnic histories and origins, but they all bear the influence of a common European heritage.  This course aims to provide a broad introduction to the history of western civilization from around 500 B.C. until 1918 A.D., surveying major events, cultural developments and personalities during a period when so many of the familiar ideas, institutions, practices and ways of thinking of the modern Western world took shape.
 
HIST 1203 1XX/2YY - The Twentieth Century (Fall/Winter)
K. Freeman
TR 10 - 11:15 am
Class location: SB265
Course description: An historical approach to the major problems of our time.  Emphasis will be placed upon the backgrounds to World Wars I and II, the emergence of the United States as a world power, the Communist Revolution and its impact, and the problems of industrial society.
 
HIST 1222 1 - Introduction to East Asian History (Fall)
X. Sun
MW 11:30 - 12:45 pm
Class location: LA181
Course description: This introductory course explores historical change and social transformation in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam from antiquity to the present.  Emphasizing especially the Chinese and Japanese experiences, the class will examine some of the more salient social, intellectual, political, and economic features apparent in the heritage of these societies as well as some of the ways each society has influenced the others.
Note:  No previous study of Asia is required but students who have taken HIST 1209.0 cannot receive another credit for this course.
 
HIST 1252 1 – Canada to Confederation (Fall)
TBA
MW 4 - 5:15 pm
Class location: ME104
Course description: This course will examine early Canadian history from the time of the first native-European contact up to Confederation.  Emphasis will be placed on the development of New France/Lower Canada, Upper Canada, and the West.  Political, social, and economic themes will be considered.
 
HIST 1253 2A – Canada: Confederation to Present (Winter)
TBA
MW 4 - 5:15 pm
Class location: SB265
Course description: This course will examine the shape of political culture in modern Canada; the debate between the advocates of the nation state and of federalism; and the impact of industrialization, regionalism, war, and depression on that debate.
 
HIST 1255 1 - The United States: 1865 to Present (FAll)
TBA
TR 4 - 5:15 pm
Class location: LA297
Course Description: This course will explore the history of the modern United States since its Civil War, examining the social, economic, political, and transnational developments of the last century and a half. Through lectures and reading, we will cover such themes as political economy, international relations, urbanization, social movements, migration, and the development of the state.
Required Reading: William H. Chafe, The Rise and Fall of the American Century: The United States from 1890-2009 (New York: Oxford University Press, 2009)
Articles in course reader
 
HIST 1826 2 - Introduction to Latin American History (Winter)
Gregg French

TR 4 - 5:15 pm
Class location: LA181

Course descriptionIn this course, students will examine major themes in Latin American history, such as conquest, colonialism, slavery, caudillismo, populism, immigration, political unrest and social struggles. 
 
HIST 1827.1A & 1B - Sp. Top. Introduction to the History of Science and Technology (Fall)
TBA
MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm & TR 1 - 2:15 pm
Class location: LA188 & LA181                       
Course description: The modern concept of science encompasses the study of the natural world in a systematic manner to accumulate knowledge. The term “science” dates only to the early nineteenth century, however, humans’ desire to understand the world around them stretches back through human history. Throughout the term we will follow the evolution of scientific inquiry and methodology from antiquity to modernity. This course examines the major developments in the history of science and technology, including the emergence of science in antiquity, medieval science, the Scientific Revolution, the expansion of science in the modern world, the relation between science and society, and the cultural significance of science and technology. 
 
HIST 1827 2A - Intro: History of Science & Technology (Winter)
TBA
MW 8:30 - 9:45 am
Class location: LA296
Course description: See above.
 

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2000 Level Courses

 

HIST 2201 2WW - Environmental History of Europe: 1300-1900 (Winter)
L. Warner
WEB
Course description: From farming practices in the medieval period to the smog and blackened landscapes of the industrial nineteenth century, Europeans have had an impact on their environment. Students explore the changes and how European encounters with the new world brought disease, and an exchange of foods, animals and plants between 204 History the continents. This course provides a long-term perspective on changes in climate, water and land use, breeding as well as species extinction, and the foods available in Europe and its North American colonies from 1300-1900.
 
HIST 2341 1 - Alantic Provinces History to 1867 (Fall)
J. Reid
TR 10 - 11:15 am
Course location: MM211
Course descriptionCommencing with the earliest Native-European contact in the Atlantic Provinces, students in this course will examine the interactions among the peoples who inhabited the region up until the mid-nineteenth century.  Major events, such as wars, treaties, and Confederation, will also be considered.
 
HIST 2342 2 - Alantic Provinces History From 1867 (Winter)
J. Reid
MW  10 - 11:15 am
Course location: LA276
Course descriptionBeginning with the post-Confederation era, and then moving into the phases of industrialization and deindustrialization, students in this course will study social, economic, and political developments in the region up to the end of the twentieth century and beyond.  Major events such as the two World Wars will also be considered.
 
HIST 2354 1 - Japan before 1800 (Fall)
B. Sewell
MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: LA177
Course description: 
 
HIST 2355 1 - Late Tokugawa & Imperial Japan (Fall)
B. Sewell
MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: LA178
Course description:
 
HIST 2381 2 - China Before 1800 (Winter)
X. Sun
MW 10 - 11:15 am
Class location: HC211
Course description: This course explores roughly four millennia of Chinese history, from the distant origins of Chinese society to its zenith during the Qing Dynasty. Divided into three eras - Ancient, Early Imperial, and Late Imperial - the class follows a thematic approach that considers the dynamics of political, economic, intellectual, and social change within each era. No previous study of China is required
 
HIST 2383 1 - China Since 1949 (Fall)
X. Sun
MW 10 - 11:15 am
Class location: HC211
Course description
 
HIST 2397 2 - Imperial Britian 1870-Present (Winter)
M. Vance
TR 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: LA277
Course description: Since the late nineteenth century, many Britons have been preoccupied with notions of imperial, economic, and social decline. This course will test the validity of these perceptions by surveying important changes which have affected British society from the height of British imperial power to the Falklands War. Some topics to be explored are: “new imperialism”, the women’s suffrage movement, decolonization, deindustrialization, mass unemployment, Labour socialism, Thatcherism, the impact of two world wars, and the rise of Celtic (Irish, Scottish, and Welsh) nationalisms.
 
HIST 2401 2 - Canadian Political History (Winter)
B. Brown
MW10 - 11:15 am
Class location: AT216
Course description
 
HIST 2451 1 - Greek History I: Minos to Medes (Fall)
TBA
MW 1 - 2:15 pm
Class location: AT216
Course description
 
HIST 2453 2 - Republic & Revolution: Rome History (Winter)
TBA
TR 10 - 11:15 am
Class location: B205
Course description:
 
HIST 2526 1WW - War & Society
TBA
WEB
Course description:  
 
HIST 2837 2 - Sp. Top. The French Revolution (Winter)
K. Freeman
TR 1 - 2:15 pm
Course location
: B201
Course description: This course takes the form of a historical role-playing game set in a pivotal period of the French Revolution from July 1791 to September 1792. Each student will be assigned a character (a real historical figure) and work towards achieving their character’s victory objectives. To do so, students will conduct research, write and deliver speeches and position papers, and participate in debates and negotiations with other players. The outcome of the game may differ from actual history, but a post mortem session at the end of the game will set the record straight.

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3000 Level Courses

HIST 3000.1 - Special Topic The Discipline of History
B. Brown
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MM223
Course description: This course addresses the theories, methods, principles and problems associated with the discipline of history. It examines the following basic areas of historical inquiry: the purposes of historical study; the relevance of the past; the relationship between the past and present; the nature and validity of historical knowledge; the relationship of history to other disciplines; and the development of historical interpretation. 
 
HIST 3110 1 - Women in the Two World Wars (Fall)
K. Freeman

TR 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MM211

Course description
 
HIST 3203 1WW - History of the Body, Health & Sex (Fall)
L. Warner
WEB
Course description:
 
HIST 3300 1WW - British Pop Music & Culture (Fall)
TBA
WEB
Course descriptionStudents explore popular culture in Britain during the 19th and 20th centuries through the study of British popular music – emphasizing the youth culture that emerged after World War II. American and Imperial cultural influences are examined through groups and movements such as the Beatles, Punk, and Reggae.
 
HIST 3301 1 - Crime & Punishment England b. 1800 (Fall)
T. Stretton
MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: MM223
Course description
 
HIST 3303 2 - Law & Society in Britain 1500-1800 (Winter)
T. Stretton
MW 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: MM201
Course description: 
 
HIST 3403 1 - The Invention of Canada (Fall) 
B. Brown
MW 10 - 11:15 am
Class location: MM335
Class description
 
HIST 3406 1 - The Renaissance in Europe (Fall)
L. Warner
TR 10 - 11:15 am 
Class location: MN219
Course description
 
HIST 3409 1 - Roman Britain & Western Provinces (Fall)
M. McCallum
TR 10 - 11:15 am
Class location: LA282
Course description:
 
HIST 3416 1 - Love and Family in China (Fall)
X. Sun
M 4 - 6:30 pm
Class location: LS271
Course description:
 
HIST 3465 2 - Scotland's Histories (Winter) 
K. Kehoe 
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm 
Class location: LA274
Course description:
 
HIST 3470 1 - British Black Atlantic (Fall)
M. Vance
TR 11:30 am - 12:45 pm
Class location: LA277
Course description
 
HIST 3827 1 - History of Advertising in Canada (Fall)
N. Neatby
R 1 - 3:45 pm
Class location: Halifax Central Library
Course description: This course examines the history of advertising in Canada from the late 19th century until the present day. Advertizing will be understood broadly to encompass the changing strategies companies have used over time to market their consumer products, standard advertising methods political parties have used to propagate their ideas, and the approaches governments have deployed to promote their policies in the public. The course will also examine the ways in which  advertizing has both reflected and indirectly shaped Canadians’ attitudes towards race, class and gender and transformed citizens of all stripes into consumers.

Note:  This is not a course on “how to do” advertising.

 
HIST 3828 1 - Field Course in History (Fall)
M. McCallum
W 1 - 3:45 pm
Class location: LA271
Course description:
 
HIST 3845 2 - Sp. Top. Ancient Technology (Winter)
TBA
MW 2:30 - 3:45 pm
Course location: B207
Course description

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4000 Level Courses

4200 1 - Women's Rights Britain 1500-1925 (Fall)
T. Stretton
T 1:00 - 3:45 pm
Course location
: MN219
Course descriptionThe rights and obligations of women in a society are often central to their status, economic power and life experience. Students examine changes in women’s legal rights, entitlements and duties in England and (to a lesser extent) Wales and Scotland over the course of more than four centuries. Topics include property rights, inheritance practices, domestic violence, the gap between legal theory and social practice, the differing experiences of single, married and widowed women, female citizenship and nationality, and women suffrage.
 
HIST 4500 1XX/2YY - The Honours Seminar (Fall/Winter)
N. Neatby
T 4:00 - 6:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: Honours History students have the opportunity to engage in independent research and write an honours thesis with the help and direction of a supervisor.  The Honours Seminar provides a framework to assist each student in the preparation of the thesis.  The seminar places an emphasis on research skills, historical methods and approaches, theories of history and the use of sources and evidence in order to help students develop and write the honours thesis.  Students will be evaluated on their course work and presentations as well as the honours thesis.
 
HIST 4501 0YY - Public History (Winter)
N. Neatby
W 1:00 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MN219
Couse description: This course introduces students both to the field of public history and to the application of history and historical methods in a variety of workplace settings. Public history, which involves the practices and presentation of history outside academia, involves a wide range of practioners including historians, museum curators, film makers, researchers, journalists, and archivists. This course will examine the evolution of public history as a discipline since the 1960s and focus on the presentation of history in various films, exhibits and historic sites. The course content will be primarily Canadian and American examining questions about ethics, standards and audience.
 
HIST 4527 1 - Biography and History (Fall)
J. Reid
W 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: This course will examine the relationship between biography and history, beginning with consideration of how far the essentials of historical methodology can be followed in biographical study. A variety of forms of biography will then be examined, including private and public approaches to biography, autobiography, and popular biography. Specific biographical subjects will be explored in detail as case studies. The central question considered throughout will be whether biography, in any of its forms, can be considered either as a form of historical enquiry or as a valid historical source.
 
HIST 4571 2 - Sp. Top. British Colonization (Winter)
M. Vance
R 1 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description:
 
HIST 4573 2 - Sp. Top. Guns, Violence and the Law (Winter)
B. Brown
M 1 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description:  
 
HIST 4574 2 - Interdisciplinary Study Asia (Winter)
W. Sewell
M 1 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MN519
Course description:
 
HIST 4842 2 - Environmental History of China (Winter)
X. Sun
M 4 - 6:30 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description:  

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6000 Level Courses

HIST 6501 0YY - Public History (Winter
N. Neatby
W 1:00 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MN219
Course Description: See HIST 4501.

HIST 6527 1 - Biography and History (Fall) 
J. Reid
W 4:00 - 6:30 pm
Course location: MN219
Course description: See HIST 4527.
 
HIST 6571 2 - Sp. Top. British Colonization (Winter)
M. Vance
R 1 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: 
 
HIST 6650 1XX/2YY - Seminar in Advanced Historiography (Fall/Winter)  - Required
N Neatby
T 4:00 - 6:29 pm
Class location: MN219
Course Description: This seminar will examine selected contemporary historiographical issues and guide Masters students in the preparation of their thesis proposals.
 
HIST 6672 2 - Environmental History of China (Winter)
X. Sun
M 4 - 6:30 pm
Course location: MN219
Course description
 
HIST 6673 1 - Women's Rights in Britain (Fall)
T. Stretton
T 1 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description
 
HIST 6673 2 - Sp. Top. Guns, Violence & the Law (Winter)
B. Brown
M 1 - 3:45 pm
Class location: MN219
Course description: 
 
HIST 6674 2 - Grad Seminar: Comm Leadership (Winter)
K. Kehoe
W 4 - 6:30 pm
Course location: MN219
Course description
 
HIST 6690 1XX/2YY – Thesis Research (Fall/Winter) - Required
N. Neatby
TBA
Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
Students will engage in the research and writing of a thesis under the supervision of a thesis supervisor.  The student must satisfy the supervisor that thesis research and all other methodological and disciplinary preparation for the successful handling of the thesis topic have been completed.  Supervisors may require a demonstration of language competence or extra course work as preparation for the treatment of certain thesis topics.  Students will publicly defend their thesis, following which a final grade will be determined by the thesis committee.
 

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